chimney pots

By: Lesley

Jan 05 2012

Category: Toronto

11 Comments

Aperture:f/4.8
Focal Length:32.7mm
ISO:100
Shutter:1/80 sec
Camera:DMC-TZ3

These elegant chimney pots belong to the 1890 era Romanesque building at 135 St George St at Bloor St in Toronto. Originally a family home for the very wealthy Gooderhams it is now owned by the York Club.

Participating in Thursday Things in a Row

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11 comments on “chimney pots”

  1. I like the mix of different colors and textures here.

  2. This is so cool! And interesting! So many different patterns and shapes! Great contribution! Thanks!

  3. so unique, i like this a lot!

  4. This one sent me to Wiki to read up on chimney pots. They’re not what I’ve always thought they were (when I’ve seen mention of them in an English mystery or whatever)…..now I know. And I also know that your picture is beautiful.

    • Right, now you have me curious as to what you originally though they were?! Isn’t it funny how countries that share a language can end up using completely different terminology.

  5. Beautiful colors in the brick work! Nice shot!

  6. I’m always taking shots of this house too – it’s s gorgeous. I’d love to get inside – a friend went to a wedding there last summer and it sounds fabulous. Great shot – I’ll have to check out the chimney pots!

  7. The style and colors combine to make a great looking structure. The house itself must be magnificent.

  8. I love the craftsmanship exhibited in the Chimneypots! Those craftsmen really showed a lot of pride in their workmanship! Beautiful and good eye!

  9. Wow, what a great photo of a wonderful chimney! A work of exquisite art for sure, that has me wondering what the building beneath it looks like, inside and out. I recently finished reading At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson, from which I learned (along with a million other fascinating and often disturbing things) a great deal about bricks and their historic use in construction. My great-grandfather was a bricklayer in Minnesota during summers and in the Deep South during winters, and after reading that part of Bryson’s book and seeing your fascinating and beautiful photo, I have more admiration for his chosen trade and wish I could see examples of his work!

  10. I love this shot….


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