mellos for breakfast

By: Lesley

Dec 08 2011

Category: Ottawa

17 Comments

Aperture:f/5.6
Focal Length:7.3mm
ISO:125
Shutter:1/0 sec
Camera:DMC-ZS7

Open 24 hours a day, this greasy spoon diner has seen it all. Located near Byward Market since long before the area became a trendy tourist attraction, it gets good reviews on Yelp and Urbanspoon and is apparently known for its poutine.

Participating in signs, signs

17 comments on “mellos for breakfast”

  1. This has an interesting shape!

  2. I love these retro signs!

  3. An older type of sign not seen on newer establishments. Sometimes greasy spoons have good food.

  4. Hey, how lucky to chose a great location before it becomes trendy!

  5. The sign really does say “greasy spoon diner”, doesn’t it? Well-spotted and captured!

  6. from the signage alone, looks like a cozy comfy place to eat.

  7. I’m not familiar with what a “Greasy spoon diner” is, and I have never heard of poutine. But I read the info, and have to say, it does not tempt me at all. Sorry to be so negative, is it a common dish in your part of the world? It’s an interesting sign! 🙂

  8. Inger – I am not taken with poutine, either – sounds disgusting to me, but it is very popular in Quebec and is becoming more popular here, too.
    A greasy spoon is a diner that is usually family owned that has no pretensions and serves basic food.

  9. I can remember seeing signs like this everywhere … sadly there are few left. I’m so glad to see this one!

    P.S. We lost our local “greasy spoon” diner years ago, and meals out in our town have never been the same.

  10. Buddy and I will always eat in an old diner when we come up upon one. They always have good old food. We have had a replica of one open here in lexington, but have not tried it yet. Am wondering if the sign is an old neon one. They are the best of all. genie

  11. I love old restaurant signs. This one is cool! And, I’m happy to report, that I KNOW what poutine is! And I’m an American! Thank God for my Canadian friends! Yipee! I’ve never eaten poutine, and it doesn’t really sound good to me, but if I traveled somewhere where it was being served, I would certainly try it ONCE!

  12. This certainly is a retro restaurant sign. Is the interior of the same vintage? When did poutine start being served outside of Quebec?

    • Poutine has slowly been creeping in over the years – now it seems normal to see it on many menus. This is an old sign and the interior has not changed since the 40s

      • I’ll have to look for poutine next time I am in Canada… although I’m not sure I’d particularly like it. 🙂

  13. Some days I like to try places like this and others I want a chain restaurant where I know the food.

  14. Mellos sounds like it should be the name of a breakfast cereal. Thanks for the link to poutines — I think I’ll pass. But I’d eat there — greasy spoons often have pretty good breakfasts and I am one who canNOT miss that meal!

  15. My husband and his brother own and operate an independent (non-chain) full-service restaurant in a small town with some considerable tourist traffic. Several years ago I nudged them into the 21st century by creating a Facebook page and encouraging them to revamp our stale homemade website. Then we began monitoring our ratings on sites like Urbanspoon, Yelp, and Tripadvisor. Not all reviews are good, and we’re fine with that because we recognize that there is ALWAYS room for improvement. Sometimes though people have been downright mean. We got a review once by a woman who had complained about everything then walked out without paying. Her review was so scathing that if our servers hadn’t actually remembered her, we would’ve sworn she was reviewing the wrong restaurant! So my husband and I were talking this morning about how social media and the internet have altered the restaurant marketing landscape and how we are in direct competition with national chains. I got to thinking about the average restaurant guest and how much weight is placed on the reviews posted on the aforementioned sites and others like them.


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