see-saw bridge

By: Lesley

Jul 31 2011

Category: bridges, Kingston

13 Comments

Aperture:f/3.5
Focal Length:5.3mm
ISO:80
Shutter:1/125 sec
Camera:DMC-ZS7

Bascule means see-saw in French and here we have a fine view of the imposing counterweight that pivots to allow the bridge to open for marine traffic. At the southern end of the Rideau Canal in Kingston, the LaSalle Causeway Bascule bridge crosses over the Cataraqui River. It is raised and lowered more than 900 times during the navigation period of end of May to mid November. This particular bascule is a 1917 Strauss Trunnion – designed by the same man responsible for the Golden Gate Bridge – and recently underwent a nine month repair and repaint operation.

Participating in Sunday Bridges

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13 comments on “see-saw bridge”

  1. That’s awesome, in many ways! Such a massive structure.

  2. This is biggest piece of a bridge I have ever seen. It is gigantic. Would love to see it in operation. Sounds like it is a VERY busy one and appears to be in ship-shape condition. Great capture. Fab macro shot. Genie

  3. We have some of these in the Delta around SF Bay Area. They’re pretty amazing!

  4. Now, this I would love to see in operation!

  5. You have opened my eyes and mind to new information. Thanks.

  6. this is a hard working bridge!

  7. That is one impressive bridge! Don’t think I’ve ever seen one like it. Great shot and thanks for the history, Lesley.

  8. I find the variety of mechanisms to open bridges is very interesting. Growing up in Southern California I never encountered them in childhood.

  9. Awesome, yes it is. I like the way you look at the side and great information.

  10. That’s quite a contraption! Looks like it was made from a giant Erector set!

  11. That is impressive. I’d be nervous every time I drove under that counterweight!

  12. Looks like a monster of a bridge! Great shot.

  13. […] Cataraqui River into the city of Kingston. A view of the counterweight at the other end was posted here. The entire bridge underwent a recoating to deal with some of the rust and peeling paint of the […]


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