Murney Tower

By: Lesley

Jul 24 2011

Category: bridges, Kingston

12 Comments

Aperture:f/3.3
Focal Length:4.1mm
ISO:160
Shutter:1/0 sec
Camera:DMC-ZS7

The Murney Tower, one of four Martello towers in Kingston, built in 1846 as part of the fortifications during the Oregon Crisis.  It stands surrounded by a dry ditch and is only accessible by bridge, which you will need to cross if you wish to visit the now museum.

Participating in Sunday Bridges

12 comments on “Murney Tower”

  1. Cool! Amazing stonework!!

  2. That bell shaped thing, a prison, with tiny windows and if anyone escape, he will drown at the moat?

  3. Exceptionally good choice for today’s meme. Different and historically interesting.

  4. A classic for Sunday Bridges and a discover of Southern Ontario.

  5. This looks like a fascinating place to visit. I find places like this to be very interesting.

  6. A stunning photo with the contrast of straight lines and curves. Tell me about the Oregon Crisis that caused Kingston to build such fortifications, please.

  7. There was a dispute between BNA (British North America) and the USA over the boundary of lands west of the Rockies. Apparently, this reached a fevered pitch and there were fears of an American led invasion into other British held lands. The British had their fur trade and needed Fort Vancouver (now WA) as their headquarters port of entry, but the Americans wanted to settle the area. Tensions rose. A compromise was reached and thus we have the 49th parallel as the boundary both east and west of the Rockies.

  8. An interesting post, Lesley, including the history. I’ve been to Kingston (decades ago) and don’t remember seeing the Martello towers. Great addition to Sunday Bridges!

  9. I thought you were in England with this one!!! Interesting bit of history!

  10. I love the places that you take us to. I never seem to get out of the city.

  11. This is SO COOL! Thanks for sharing!

  12. Your shot makes me think of the Tower of London. Great shot and what a fabulous piece of your history. It is wonderful condition. Wish I would go in and visit the museum. I love the old structures like this. The stone is beautiful. Genie


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